out now: Robert Görl – The Paris Tapes [Grönland Records]

 

Artist:
Robert Görl

 

Title:
The Paris Tapes

 

Label:
Grönland Records

 

Cat#:
GRON184

 

Release Date:
21st April 2018

 

Format:
CD, vinyl & digital

 

Tracklist:
01.
Part 1

02.
Part 2

03.
Part 3

04.
Part 4

05.
Part 5

06.
Part 6

07.
Part 7

08.
Part 8

09.
Part 9

10.
Part 10

 

Tracklist Digtital:
01.
Part 1

02.
Part 2

03.
Part 3

04.
Part 4

05.
Part 5

06.
Part 6

07.
Part 7

08.
Part 8

09.
Part 9

10.
Part 10

11.
Part 1
(Vince Clarke Remix)

 

Press Info (English):
Everything begins with something ending, albeit not forever. At the start of the 1980s Robert Görl and Gabi Delgado enjoyed tremendous success as the duo Deutsch Amerikanische Freundschaft, until they split up in 1982 following a dispute. In 1986, after a short-lived attempt at a reunion, they broke up again, and this time for a significantly longer period of time. Robert Görl says that was a very difficult time for him and that he was deeply disappointed in his musical partner and friend; while working on the LP 1st Step to Heaven they had such a big falling-out that he lost all interest in making music.

And so he decided to try his hand at something new and headed to New York to study acting at the renowned Stella Adler Studio of Acting. He rehearsed Shakespeare and other classics for a semester, and could have perhaps launched a stage career; however, after returning from a brief trip home, he was detained and interrogated upon arrival in New York. The immigration officer asked him what he was doing in the city, he replied that he was studying acting – “That’s interesting,” the officer said. Four days later Görl received a notification in the mail stating that he had violated immigration laws because he was pursuing a course of study in the United States with only a tourist visa; he, therefore, had to leave the country immediately and would not be allowed to enter the United States for the next ten years.

Not only did he now no longer have a band, he could also no longer study or remain in the city that he had just learned to love. That, however, was only the beginning of his problems. When he flew back to Germany he was detained at the airport. He was told the German armed forces – the Bundeswehr – had been searching for him for quite some time because he had dodged his mandatory military service; he was not allowed to leave the country and had to report to the army within a few days or military police would arrest him. Görl thought it over a few days then packed his few belongings in a suitcase, put his freshly purchased synthesizer under his arm and got on a night train from Munich to Paris; sleepless, his heart racing, he awaited border control, but they did not even open the door to his compartment. The next morning he stood at Gare de l’Est and set out to find cheap lodging. He ultimately found a place in Levallois-Perret, a northwestern suburb of Paris. His plan was to stay there for about a year, until he had reached the age at which he could no longer be conscripted. He had a small room with a kitchenette and a washbasin. He knew no one in the city and did not want to meet anyone; even if he had wanted, it would have been difficult because he spoke no French.

Robert Görl was now stuck alone in a boardinghouse in the Paris suburbs, spending his days – and especially his nights – making music. He used his new, freshly released synthesizer – an ESQ-1 from the company Ensoniq – it featured eight voices, a built-in sequencer and thousands of preprogrammed sounds. It was a machine that could be used almost like the workstations that would simplify and dramatically change the production of electronic music at the end of the 1980s. In the solitude of his hermetic existence, Robert Görl managed to venture into the future of music: night after night he delved ever deeper into the possibilities the synthesizer provided him; he composed and superimposed musical layers over one another; he crafted sounds, reworked them and sometimes erased them again; he arranged rhythms and basses and modulated the music –particularly the low tones – so much that they sounded more sibilant and “dirtier.” This rendered the songs ever more dramatic and personal. They mirrored the life crisis Görl found himself in, yet were also a timely cure to rid him of the idea that he had gotten caught in a failed existence.

He stayed in the boardinghouse in Levallois-Perret for half a year before finding a place to stay with two of his sister’s girlfriends. But after three quarters of a year in Paris he got the feeling that he urgently needed to return home. And he was lucky: when he got back to Munich the Bundeswehr left him in peace. Things were looking up. His time in Paris had given him newfound optimism and had also rekindled his desire to make music; he decided that he now wanted to make a pop album out of the songs he had composed on his ESQ-1 and recorded on standard cassette tapes. He flew to London to meet Daniel Miller, who had released DAF’s first albums on his label Mute Records. Miller put him into contact with Dee Long, a progressive rock musician who was then playing in a new wave band. In Long’s studio in southern England Görl and Long worked on new arrangements of Görl’s Paris tracks. They then planned to rehearse and record the music in Beatles producer George Martin’s Air Studios. Before doing that Görl visited Munich one last time, going to visit his brother just outside the city. On his way home he hit a tree at high speed after losing control of his car on an icy road.

Görl spent half a year in the hospital and a rehab facility. His doctors took great pains to save his life. His right arm was shattered to pieces and had to be reconstructed with steel implants; he was also unable to use his legs for several weeks and had to relearn how to walk. Robert Görl managed to crawl out of the depths of life crisis for only a brief time before crashing back into nothingness; this time, however, nothingness immediately revealed new possibilities to him. After his release from the hospital he returned to his apartment only to find it empty. His friends in Munich had not expected him to survive and had divvied up his possessions among them; years later a woman still proudly told him that she slept beneath his old bedspread. But he missed none of it, not the bedspread nor any of his other possessions; he had no desire to make music either. During that time he did not think once about the album he had been working on before the accident. Instead, he went to Thailand to become a monk in a Buddhist monastery. He spent three years there before realizing that he could not find what he was looking for in a monastery, but only within himself. Thus, in the summer of 1992, he returned to Germany and danced to music that sounded like it was directly descended from D.A.F. at the Love Parade in Berlin. He spent the next few years as a techno DJ, but that is another story altogether.

A cassette of the unfinished songs from Paris, the dramatic, vivid, sometimes noxiously sibilant, yet always tenderly wrought tracks that Robert Görl recorded during his most profound life crisis turned up years later in a suitcase he had deposited in his brother’s barn. They remain musical sketches; Görl says he never felt the desire to make a real album out of them. They are sketches, but, in them, an entire time speaks to us, as does a life at a turning point; and the light that shimmers above the dark foundations of the noxious beats guides us into the future: everything ends with something beginning.

 

Press Info (German):
Alles beginnt damit, dass etwas endet, allerdings nicht für alle Zeit. Zu Beginn der Achtzigerjahre feiern Robert Görl und Gabi Delgado in dem Duo Deutsch-Amerikanische Freundschaft (D.A.F.) ungeheure Erfolge, dann streiten sie und gehen auseinander, zum ersten Mal im Jahr 1982 und, nach dem schnell gescheiterten Versuch einer Wiedervereinigung, 1986 zum zweiten Mal und nunmehr für lange Zeit. Eine sehr schwere Episode sei das für ihn gewesen, sagt Robert Görl, er war tief enttäuscht von seinem künstlerischen Partner und Freund: Während der Arbeit an dem Album 1st Step to Heaven hätten sie sich derart entzweit, dass ihm die Lust an der Musik völlig verging.

Darum will er danach etwas anderes versuchen, er geht nach New York und studiert Schauspiel an der namhaften Schule von Stella Adler. Ein Semester lang erprobt er sich an Shakespeare und anderen Klassikern und hätte vielleicht eine Bühnenkarriere begonnen – hätte man ihn nicht eines Tages, nach einem kurzen Aufenthalt in der Heimat, bei der Einreise nach New York festgehalten und verhört: Was er in der Stadt eigentlich mache, will der Sicherheitsbeamte wissen. Er studiere Schauspiel, sagt Görl. Das sei ja interessant, sagt der Beamte. Vier Tage später hat Görl einen Bescheid in der Post: Weil er in den USA einer geregelten Ausbildung nachgehe, aber nur ein Touristenvisum besitze, habe er gegen das Einwanderungsgesetz verstoßen. Darum müsse er das Land sofort verlassen; die Wiedereinreise sei ihm während der nächsten zehn Jahre verboten.

Nun hat er also nicht nur keine Band mehr. Er kann nicht weiter studieren und darf in der Stadt, die er gerade lieben gelernt hat, nicht bleiben; aber damit fangen seine Probleme erst an. Als er nämlich wieder nach Deutschland einreisen will, wird er auch hier am Flughafen festgehalten: Die Bundeswehr, sagt der Sicherheitsbeamte, fahnde schon seit längerem nach ihm, weil er sich dem Wehrdienst entzogen habe; er dürfe das Land nun nicht mehr verlassen und müsse sich binnen weniger Tage bei der Armee melden, sonst würden ihn die Feldjäger holen. Görl überlegt ein paar Tage, dann packt er seine wenigen Habseligkeiten in einen Koffer, nimmt einen gerade gekauften neuen Synthesizer unter den Arm und steigt in den Nachtzug von München nach Paris; schlaflos und mit klopfendem Herzen wartet er auf die Grenzkontrollen, aber sie öffnen nicht einmal die Tür zu seinem Abteil. So steht er am nächsten Morgen am Gare de l’Est und geht auf die Suche nach einer billigen Bleibe; er findet schließlich eine in Levallois, einem Vorort im Pariser Nordwesten. Etwa ein Jahr lang will er dort bleiben – bis er das Alter erreicht hat, in dem man ihn nicht mehr einberufen kann. Er hat ein kleines Zimmer mit einer Kochnische und einer Waschgelegenheit. Er kennt niemanden in der Stadt und will auch niemanden kennenlernen; und selbst wenn er wollte, wäre es schwierig, weil er kein Französisch spricht.

Also sitzt Robert Görl nun allein in dieser Vorortpension und verbringt die Tage und vor allem auch Nächte damit, wieder Musik zu machen: Mit seinem neuen, damals gerade auf den Markt gekommenen Synthesizer – dem ESQ-1 von der Firma Ensoniq – kann er acht musikalische Spuren bespielen, es gibt einen eingebauten Sequenzer und tausende von vorprogrammierten Sounds. Das Gerät lässt sich fast schon wie jene Workstations nutzen, die Ende der achtziger Jahre dann die elektronische Musikproduktion vereinfachen und wesentlich verändern sollen. In der Einsamkeit des aus der Zeit gefallenen Eremiten erobert Robert Görl so die musikalische Zukunft: Nacht für Nacht versenkt er sich immer tiefer in die Möglichkeiten des Synthesizers; er komponiert und legt musikalische Schichten übereinander; er gestaltet Klänge, bearbeitet sie, und manchmal löscht er sie auch wieder; er arrangiert Rhythmen und Bässe und moduliert besonders die tiefen Töne derart, dass sie zischender und schmutziger klingen. Immer dramatischer werden die Lieder auf diese Weise und auch persönlicher: Sie sind Spiegel der Lebenskrise, in der Görl sich befindet; aber auch ein gerade noch rechtzeitig gefundenes Heilmittel gegen den Glauben, in einer misslingenden Existenz festzustecken.

Er bleibt ein halbes Jahr in der Pension in Levallois, dann kommt er noch für eine Weile bei zwei Freundinnen seiner Schwester unter, aber nach einem Dreivierteljahr in Paris hat er das Gefühl, dringend nach Hause zurück zu müssen. Und er hat Glück: Als er wieder in München ist, wird er von der Bundeswehr in Ruhe gelassen. Es geht bergauf, die Zeit in Paris hat ihm seinen Lebensmut wiedergegeben und auch die Lust an der Musik; aus den Songs, die er auf dem ESQ-1 komponiert und auf handelsüblichen Kompaktkassetten gespeichert hat, möchte er jetzt ein Pop-Album machen. Er fliegt nach London und trifft Daniel Miller, auf dessen Mute Label dereinst die ersten DAF-Platten erschienen; Miller vermittelt ihn an Dee Long, einen Progressive-Rock-Musiker, der inzwischen in einer New-Wave-Gruppe spielt. In seinem Studio im Süden Englands arbeiten Görl und Long an neuen Arrangements für die Pariser Stücke; in den Air Studios des Beatles-Produzenten George Martin soll die Musik dann eingespielt und aufgenommen werden. Bevor es soweit ist, fährt Görl noch einmal nach München und besucht in der Nähe der Stadt seinen Bruder; auf dem Heimweg verliert er auf eisglatter Straße die Kontrolle über sein Auto und prellt in hoher Geschwindigkeit gegen einen Baum.

Ein halbes Jahr verbringt er im Krankenhaus und in einer Reha-Station; mit Mühe und Not retten die Ärzte sein Leben, sein rechter Arm ist zertrümmert und muss mit stählernen Implantaten rekonstruiert werden; auch seine Beine kann er wochenlang nicht benutzen und muss das Gehen dann wieder neu lernen. Aus dem tiefen Tal der Lebenskrisen ist Robert Görl also nur kurz wieder emporgekrochen, um erneut in das Nichts zu fallen; aber diesmal zeigt ihm das Nichts sofort seine Möglichkeiten. Als er aus dem Krankenhaus entlassen wird, findet er seine Wohnung leer. Die Münchener Freunde haben nicht mit seinem Überleben gerechnet und den Besitz darum unter sich aufgeteilt, noch Jahre später wird ihm eine Frau stolz erzählen, dass sie unter seiner alten Bettdecke schläft. Aber er vermisst nichts, weder die Bettdecke noch seine sonstigen Habseligkeiten; und auch das Musizieren ist ihm gleichgültig geworden: An das Album, an dem er vor dem Unfall gearbeitet hat, denkt er in dieser Zeit nicht ein einziges Mal. Stattdessen geht er nach Thailand, um Mönch in einem buddhistischen Kloster zu werden; dreieinhalb Jahre bringt er dort herum, bis er begreift, dass er das, was er sucht, in einem Kloster nicht finden kann, sondern nur in sich selbst. So kehrt er – inzwischen schreiben wir den Sommer 1992 – nach Deutschland zurück und tanzt in Berlin auf der Love Parade zu einer Musik, die wie das Erbe von D.A.F. klingt; die nächsten Jahre wird er als Techno-DJ verbringen, aber das ist eine andere Geschichte.

Die unvollendeten Songs aus Paris, diese dramatischen, strahlenden, manchmal giftig zischenden, aber doch immer ganz zärtlich gewirkten Lieder, die Robert Görl in der Zeit seiner tiefsten Lebenskrise aufnimmt, finden sich Jahre später auf einer Kassette in einem Koffer, den er in der Scheune seines Bruders deponiert hatte. Es sind immer noch nur musikalische Skizzen, er habe nie wieder den Wunsch verspürt, ein richtiges Album daraus zu machen, sagt Görl. Es sind Skizzen – aber solche, aus denen eine ganze Zeit zu uns spricht und ein Leben, das an einem Wendepunkt steht; und das Licht, das über dem dunklen Grund der giftigen Beats schimmert, leitet uns in die Zukunft: Alles endet damit, dass etwas beginnt.

Text von Jens Balzer

 

Listen:
Soon

 

Full Track Streaming:
“Part 2”

 

Buy CD:
Grönland Shop
Amazon GER
more soon

 

Buy Vinyl:
Grönland Shop
Amazon
more soon

 

Buy Digital:
Google Play
iTunes
more soon

 

Websites:
DAF @ Facebook
Grönland Records

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.